December 29, 2016

Core & Project Leads

Roger L. Albin, MD

Roger L. Albin, MD 
Director, U-M Udall Center
Udall Project III Lead
Anne B. Young Collegiate Professor of Neurology
Co-director, Movement Disorders Division, Department of Neurology
Associate director of research, VAAAHS Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center

Roger L. Albin, M.D. is the Anne B. Young Collegiate Professor of Neurology and co-director of the Movement Disorders Division in the Department of Neurology, University of Michigan Medical School. In addition, he serves as Associate director of research at the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center. Dr. Albin trained in Neurology at Michigan where he subsequently pursued a combined clinical and research fellowship under the mentorship of Anne Young and the late Jack Penney. He is internationally recognized as a leader in understanding the pathophysiology and pathogenesis of basal ganglia diseases, particularly in understanding the neurochemical-anatomic correlates of clinical features of basal ganglia disorders. With Drs. Penney and Young, he developed the “classic model” of basal ganglia pathophysiology, which continues to be influential and in part established the rationale for target selection for surgical treatments for Parkinson disease. That work and his subsequent laboratory studies, predominantly in rodent models of Parkinson and Huntington disease, have yielded fundamental insights into the anatomy, physiology and pharmacology of these disorders.

He has long complemented this work with clinical research, predominantly using PET and related methods to define the alterations of neurochemical anatomy that underlie clinical features of basal ganglia diseases. This work includes the development and evaluation of novel PET ligands and experience with early and later phase trials in PD and Huntington disease (including serving on the DSMBs of major trials). In recent years he has focused on the very disabling non-dopaminergic features of PD, including impairments of gait and posture and abnormalities of sleep, cognition and behavior. Dr. Albin also has a long and distinguished record of mentoring and five of his trainees currently hold academic faculty positions.

Nicolaas Bohnen MD, PhD

Nicolaas Bohnen MD, PhD
Associate Director, U-M Udall Center
Udall Clinical Resource Core Co-Lead
Udall Project I Lead
Professor, Departments of Radiology and Neurology
Director, U-M Functional Neuroimaging, Cognitive and Mobility Laboratory

Nicolaas Bohnen MD, PhD is a Professor of Radiology and Neurology at the University of Michigan. He is the Director of the University of Michigan Functional Neuroimaging, Cognitive and Mobility Laboratory. His clinical research focuses on neurobiological correlates of mobility and cognition in normal aging and Parkinson disease and biomarker development for the diagnosis and treatment monitoring in Parkinson disease. He also directs the Ann Arbor VA Movement Disorders clinic where he trains Neurology residents.

Kirk Frey, MD, PhD

Kirk Frey, MD, PhD
Udall Clinical Resource Core Co-Lead
David E. Kuhl Collegiate Professor
Professor, Departments of Radiology and Neurology
Director, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
Director, Center for Positron Emission Tomography
Director, Nuclear Medicine Fellowship Program

 Kirk Frey, MD, PhD is Professor of Radiology and Neurology at the University of Michigan. He is Director, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Director of the Center for Positron Emission Tomography, and Director of the Nuclear Medicine Fellowship Program.  His clinical research focuses on molecular and hybrid imaging, and molecular imaging of neurological disorders.

Prabesh Kanel, PhD

Prabesh Kanel, PhD
Udall Neuroimaging Core Co-Lead
Research Investigator, Department of Radiology

His research interests include use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) in the study of neurodegenerative disorders, particularly Parkinson disease.  He has a strong interest in application of machine learning methods to imaging datasets and combination of imaging modalities.  Dr. Kanel has published manuscripts on MRI methods and cholinergic system changes associated with gait disorders and cognitive changes in Parkinson disease.

Robert Koeppe, PhD

Robert Koeppe, PhD
Udall Neuroimaging Core Co-Lead
Professor of Radiology
Director, PET Physics Section, Division of Nuclear Medicine

His research interests center around the quantitative aspects of positron emission tomography (PET). Specific research areas include the development and implementation of tracer kinetic models for new and existing positron labeled radiotracers, development of optimal techniques for estimation of physiological quantities, and development and implementation of automated image analysis routines for use with PET. Another specific area of research is the use of PET cerebral blood flow activation studies to examine various cognitive and neurological functions of the brain. Other research interests include the correlation and comparison of information obtained from PET studies to that obtained from corresponding anatomic imaging procedures such as magnetic resonance imaging.

Cathie Spino, ScD

Cathie Spino, ScD
Udall Biostatistics and Data Management Core Co-Lead
Research Professor of Biostatistics
Director of Statistical Analysis of Biomedical and Educational Research (SABER).

Cathie Spino, ScD is Research Professor of Biostatistics at U-M. She directs the Statistical Analysis of Biomedical and Educational Research (SABER) group and also serves as a faculty member for the Clinical Research Design and Statistical Analysis (CRDSA) MS program that helps physicians and health professionals develop expertise in research design and statistical analysis while continuing their professional employment. Her work through SABER involves statistical management of multicenter clinical studies -- both randomized clinical trials and other observational clinical studies. Prior to her recruitment to U-M in 2007, she worked in industry as a statistician and statistical manager in drug development programs in several therapeutic areas.

F. DuBois Bowman, PhD

F. DuBois Bowman, PhD - Faculty Profiles - U-M School of Public Health | Faculty Profiles | U-M School of Public HealthF. DuBois Bowman, PhD
Udall Biostatistics and Data Management Core Co-Lead
Dean, School of Public Health

A renowned expert in the statistical analysis of brain imaging data, F. DuBois Bowman is dean of the University of Michigan School of Public Health, one of the nation’s top public health programs, and Co-Lead of the Udall Center Biostatistics and Data Management Core. Dr. Bowman’s work mines massive data sets and has important implications for mental and neurological disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, depression, schizophrenia, and substance addiction. His research has helped reveal brain patterns that reflect disruption from psychiatric diseases, detect biomarkers for neurological diseases, and determine more individualized therapeutic treatments. Additionally, his work seeks to determine threats to brain health from environmental exposures and optimize brain health in aging populations.

Kelvin Chou, MD

Kelvin Chou, MD
Udall Outreach Lead
Thomas H. and Susan  C. Brown Early Career Professor of Neurology
Clinical Professor, Neurology
Clinical Professor, Neurosurgery
Co-Director, Surgical Therapies Improving Movement (STIM) Program
Co-Director, Movement Disorders Clinic

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Kelvin L. Chou, MD is the Thomas H. and Susan C. Brown Professor in the Department of Neurology. Dr. Chou also serves as Co-Director of the Surgical Therapies Improving Movement (STIM) Program and Co-Director of the Movement Disorders Clinic. He has been the Director of the U-M Movement Disorders CME since its inception and serves on the CME Committee of the Movement Disorders Society. Dr. Chou sees patients with all movement disorders, but has a particular interest in Parkinson's disease (PD) and deep brain stimulation (DBS). Dr. Chou is an outstanding clinical mentor who is frequently sought out for advice and counsel regarding the diagnosis and management of patients with Movement Disorders as well as for career advice for those interested in pursuing a career in Movement Disorders.

Dr. Chou has been named to the Best Doctors of America list and sees all patients with movement disorders (i.e., Parkinson disease, tremors, dystonia, Huntington's Disease). He has particular interest in Parkinson disease (PD) and deep brain stimulation (DBS) for movement disorders, and he also has clinical expertise in botulinum toxin injections for movement disorders such as dystonia. A strong patient advocate, Dr. Chou serves on the Professional Advisory Board of the Michigan Parkinson Foundation, the Medical Advisory Board of the International Essential Tremor Foundation (IETF) and has recently published a book for patients and families called Deep Brain Stimulation: A New Life for People with Parkinson's, Dystonia and Essential Tremor.

Martin Sarter, PhD

Martin Sarter | U-M LSA Department of PsychologyMartin Sarter, PhD
Udall Project II Lead
Charles M. Butter Collegiate Professor of Psychology
Professor, Neuroscience

Martin Sarter, PhD is a Professor of Psychology in the Department of Psychology at U-M. His research program is focused on understanding the basal forebrain cholinergic system and its role in cognitive functions, particularly attention. Much of this work has been conducted in rats, but his laboratory has used a wide range approaches ranging from mouse molecular work on choline transporters to human behavioral genetics and neuroimaging. He has successfully trained many graduate students and postdocs in the context of a highly productive research program and is an outstanding mentor.

Omar Ahmed, PhD

Omar Ahmed, PhD
Assistant Professor of Psychology, Neuroscience and Biomedical Engineering
Udall Catalyst Research Project Lead

Dr. Ahmed studies neuronal circuits underlying spatial orientation, navigation, and action timing.  This work is aimed at understanding both normal functions and the abnormalities characteristic of Parkinson disease and other neurologic disorders.  Multiple approaches, including electrophysiology, multiphoton imaging, and computational modeling, are employed to understand these circuits at a cellular level.  The role of cholinergic signals in modulating the activity of these circuits is a particular focus of the Ahmed laboratory.